20 Free Things to Do in Paris During the Summer

20 Free Things to Do During the Summer in Paris | WhyRoamTravel.com

Paris can be pretty pricey.  But don’t fear, there are plenty of things you can do while in the City of Lights that won’t break the bank.  Here are 20 things you can do during your summer visit, all for the low, low price of free.

20 Free Things to Do in Paris During the Summer

Louvre Museum in Paris | WhyRoamTravel.com

1. See some of the world’s greatest artwork
On the first Sunday of every month, museums are free. This is a great way to see some of the world’s greatest artwork at the Louvre Museum or Musée d’Orsay. I suggest going early before the doors open to stake your place in line. If you wait around and go a little later, you’ll waste half your day waiting in line to get in as these museums are always very crowded. Stop by your favorite boulangerie, pick up a pain au chocolat (click here to see where you can find the best pain au chocolat) to enjoy while you wait, and hustle to get in line at least 30 minutes before the museum doors open. You’ll be glad you did.
Click here to read more >>

Ladurée vs Pierre Hermé: A Macaron Taste Test

Ladurée vs Pierre Hermé: A Macaron Taste Test in Paris | WhyRoamTravel.com

Although macarons have never really appealed to me, I made it my mission while visiting Paris to discover what all the fuss over the bite-sized French sweets is about.

In case you’re not familiar with macarons, they’re made of two almond meringue discs and filled with a layer of buttercream, jam, or ganache.  They come in a multitude of flavors and colors.  They’re also not the cheapest thing in town, as each bite-sized sweet will run you about €2.

When it comes to macarons, there are two pâtisseries (pastry shops) that are famous in Paris, and the world over, for their rainbow assorted sweets: Ladurée and Pierre Hermé.

Since these two are known as the best of the best, I set out to do a (completely unscientific) taste test by sampling macarons from each pâtisserie.

Click here to read more >>

My 3 Favorite Creperies in Paris

Favorite Creperies in Paris | WhyRoamTravel.com

Crepes.  Oh, wonderful crepes.  No visit to France is complete without indulging in a crepe (or several).

Crepes are a very thin type of pancake, usually made from wheat flour.  Savory crepes, known as galettes, are usually made from buckwheat flour.  And when it comes to fillings and toppings, the sky is the limit.

While in Paris, I probably ate more than my share of crepes.  I regret nothing.  What can I say, all the city bike riding made me hungry.  At least that’s the excuse I’m sticking to.

Click here to read more >>

Where to Find the Best Pain Au Chocolat in Paris

pain au chocolat_Gerard Mulot

I am a self-proclaimed chocoholic. It’s true, chocolate is my drug of choice. I (think) I need a daily dose of it to cure my sweet tooth and fuel my endorphines. If there is anything with chocolate on the menu, it’s a safe bet to assume that’s what I’ll be ordering. (How can you go wrong with chocolate, right?)

Needless to say, when it comes to croissants and breakfast pastries, I have a serious weakness for pain au chocolat. In case you’re not familiar, pain au chocolat is a French pastry made from a yeast-leavened dough (very similar to croissants) and contain one or two pieces of chocolate in the centre. When freshly made and still warm from the oven, they are heavenly.

During my time in Paris, I ate more than my fair share of pain au chocolat. Some were good, some could have been better, and some were so good they kept me coming back for more.

Here are my top 5 boulangeries where you can find the best pain au chocolat in Paris.

Click here to read more >>

Ancient Roman Ruins in Paris – Arènes de Lutèce

Arenes de Lutece: Ancient Roman Ruins in Paris | WhyRoamTravel.com

When ancient Roman ruins are mentioned, you probably think of Rome, Italy, and the Colosseum. But did you know Paris is also home to a Roman arena?

Arènes de Lutèce dates backs to the 1st century AD. It can be found in Paris’ Latin Quarter in the fifth arrondissement. But chances are, unless you’re looking for it, you’ll probably pass right by it.

Sounds crazy right? How could you NOT notice a large, old arena? Well, the main entrance is off Rue Monge, and it looks just like many other apartment courtyard entrances throughout the city.

Click here to read more >>